When the A-Lawyers Break Free: BigLaw 2.0

Nutshell: The world of transactional tech law used to be divided into A-Player lawyers earning the gold at large firms and everyone else making a decent living at second-tier small firms. SaaS eliminated that world, and small can now mean better, faster, and more lucrative; which means A-Lawyers are breaking free.

No one who operates in the startup space needs to be told that bigger does not always mean better.  In fact, the opposite is often the case. Being large often makes you slower, more bureaucratic, and inefficient. Just try getting a piece of new technology adopted at a major law firm, or getting a secretary to learn that technology.  I’ve been there.

Big Was Better

If bigger leads to better performance, there must be something about the nature of the product or service in question that requires a large organization.  In law, that “something” was historically (i) expensive, proprietary resources to properly service clients (barriers to entry), (ii) the need for collaboration among multiple specialties, and (iii) high amounts of friction in effecting that collaboration.

Before the days of SaaS and Secure Cloud Storage/Collaboration, top-tier transactional law required at a minimum (i) a law library, (ii) internal word processing, (iii) teams of administrative support and attorneys, and (iv) dozens of legal specialties under the same roof.  Without that, you would be slow and inefficient.  In that world, choosing a small firm usually meant, as a fact, that you were dropping down a tier in quality.

And then things changed. Your “library” is now a subscription SaaS service. Word processing you can outsource by the hour. Same thing for admin support.  People working remotely often collaborate more easily than people working within the same law office, if they use the right tools. When BigLawyers step back from their billing timer and realize this, two very important thoughts come to mind:

  • Why are you all here? – Why do we (all kinds of different lawyers working in different areas that require different processes) need to still work under the same structure? I’m tired of having to justify to a bunch of litigators or IP lawyers that some software that I NEED for MY practice needs to be put into the budget. Why can’t I come to work in jeans if my clients don’t care? Why do I even have to come in to work today? All I do is stay in my office anyway.
  • Where the f*** do all my billings go? I bill $600 an hour. I take home like 20% of that. Wait, you mean all of this obsolete, bloated, bureaucratic infrastructure is the reason 80% of what my clients pay disappears? They hired me, not your brand. Why am I here?

Focus Always Wins

Every variable that once made the large, full service law firm necessary and optimal has been turned on its head by the web, SaaS, and the cloud. Now, a corporate lawyer at a small firm can staff a deal just as quickly, if not more quickly, utilizing a network of smaller, more focused, more efficient and (yes) better lawyers and law firms. It doesn’t take a Harvard MBA to understand why a top trademark lawyer operating out of a trademark boutique that does nothing but trademarks is going to be vastly superior at (guess what?) trademarks than a lawyer who works alongside dozens of other types of lawyers. Focus trumps being a generalist; and that applies equally to lawyers and law firms. 

But the reality of how SaaS has changed the landscape isn’t exactly news, at least not to people who follow these topics. Why then has it still seemed as if large firms have a lock on the best lawyers?


In every profession, the best expect to be paid according to their talent. This is not rocket science, nor is it surprising. A-Lawyers have stayed in BigLaw for one very simple reason: it paid the most. Notice the past tense.  When big really did mean better, the better clients went big, and that means big paid more.

But it was only a matter of time that enough top lawyers started asking themselves “where the f*** do my billings go?” and realized that BigLaw’s overhead and bloat leaves an enormous amount of room to cut out fat, charge less, and still take home WAY more.  Yes, my friends slaving away in BigLaw trying to hit your 2000-2150 billables quota so you can earn that nice little bonus amounting to 3% of your billings, the cat’s out of the bag. Many of us at small firms earn more than you do. A lot more. And we do it with better technology, a more flexible schedule, and often working from wherever we want. All while our clients pay a lot less. Who, long-term, do you think is going to win at attracting talent?

You know what’s better than profits-per-partner? Profits in your wallet.

Networked Law: BigLaw 2.0

Examples of specialists we (corporate lawyers at a small firm) use to staff deals (i) a former silicon valley BigLaw tech transactions partner (head of his group) now operating a solo practice, (ii) a T100 in Texas trademark lawyer operating out of a trademark boutique, (iii) one of the country’s leading open source specialists operating a solo practice, and (iv) a veteran venture capital paralegal working virtually from Palo Alto. Everyone bills 40-60% less on an hourly basis than they would at a major law firm, which doesn’t even account for their ability to optimize pricing, process, technology, and staffing for their practice area. And, yes, everyone takes home more than they would in BigLaw.

You know what that’s called? D-i-s-r-u-p-t-i-o-n.  I don’t use that word lightly. This is not a piece of software that large firms can ultimately pay a consultant to help them adopt, but a fundamental restructuring of how top-tier transactional law operates.

The Future

Small firms are not just for the mickey mouse club anymore. The A-Lawyers are asking “Why are you all here?” and “Where the f*** do all my billings go?” and are doing something about it. Focused, faster, efficient, networked, and now with much bigger paychecks. Small law has been around for a while. But BigLaw 2.0 is just beginning to ramp up. As more A-Lawyers set themselves free, most of BigLaw will have to face the reality that all the branding in the world can’t save a bloated, overpriced, and now completely unnecessary delivery model.

p.s. We’re hiring.